reducing sickness

World Mental Health Day 2018 - The importance of resilience in the workplace

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This week has seen mental health awareness back in the headlines, with the unveiling of World Mental Health Day 2018. The focus has been on young people and their mental health in our changing world, and the messages will have no doubt struck a cord through every headline and media channel worldwide.

Ironically, as I’m sat with my head down, embedded in my social media and ‘catching up’ on the lives of my friends and family, I have been struck by the breadth of the conversation about mental health, from young to old. It’s true, it IS vitally important that we get in early and coach young people to handle the pressures that will inevitably come. But what about those of us for whom ‘early’ intervention is too late… we are already adults, and according to MIND, 1 in 4 of us is likely to suffer a mental health issue every year.

Furthermore, we spend at least 1/3 of our life at work, it stands to reason that the work environment has a huge part to play in our mental well-being. Interestingly, no matter how old you are the story is the same, it’s about resilience, the magical ability to get knocked down and pick yourself up. The ability to survive or even thrive under pressure, to change course, to remain positive and take failure as an incentive to try and try again. 

As a manager or HR in charge of the health and wellbeing of employees, this is an area that can easily be overlooked. It can feel like there is not enough money for the ‘essentials’ let alone the icing on the cake! Yet it is never ‘too little too late’, the environment you cultivate can have an immediate effect on employee wellbeing, keep them mentally safe AND have an immediate effect on the bottom line.  

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It could be as simple as signposting to occupational health or other relevant services or taking steps to assure employees that vulnerability may feel like a weakness but to others, it looks like courage and is a brave step to make. 

As we move boldly (and less blindly) into a new era, it’s becoming clear that resiliency is a tool for survival, rather than just for success. Through our many clients at Cordell Health the same 5 resiliency factors come up time and time again…none of them are big budget and they all deliver the end result of a happier, more empowered, healthier and more productive workforce. You are, after all, only as good as your employees at the end of the day! 

Foster a sense of community

People thrive on friendships and good social interaction. People who have positive relationships in the workplace are more likely to enjoy coming to work and be productive when they get there.  

Get moving

Physical health is fundamental to our mental health, and creating a pleasant working environment and promoting healthy behaviour can bring many benefits.

Build a psychologically healthy environment

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Make the workplace a pleasant and happy environment through recognition, reward, job security and a management style and culture that promotes mutual trust and respect. If a manager has a positive mindset and a positive attitude to work it will rub off on others. 

Promote learning and development 

Developing new skills enhances a person’s capabilities and is empowering and helps their sense of wellbeing too.

Seek help 

Sometimes people require specialist support with physical or mental health issues and may need to be referred on for more support. It could also be that your business needs support tackling some of the issues it faces. For example from

  • Occupational Health

  • Employee Assistance Programs

  • Human resources

  • Counselling

  • Physiotherapy

  • Ask employees to come forward and seek support if they feel they need it

How does your business go about boosting employee resilience and have you noticed an uplift since putting strategies in place?

Cordell Health leads the agenda in Wellbeing at Work

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Here at Cordell Health, wellbeing at work is always a hot topic of conversation.  We are ever so slightly obsessed with what more can be done to assist productivity for businesses and improve life for their employees.

Last week (6th March 2018), we were excited that one of our Directors, Dr Robin Cordell, in his capacity as a Director of the Council for Work and Health, chaired the national policy session at the Health and Wellbeing @Work conference at the NEC in Birmingham. 

Top level speakers, positioned to make a real difference in the future policy making of our nation's health and work, came together to discuss and share information and strategy on a variety of key issues. Among the many topics were the International and Public Health England’s perspectives towards health and work and the NHS England strategy for improving the health of the NHS workforce.

One of the most interesting presentations was Paul Farmer CBE, Chief Executive of Mind and co-author of the Stevenson/Framer review of mental health and employers. He spoke about the key findings of the Gov.uk thriving at work review which reports that the UK workforce is facing a mental health challenge that is a lot bigger than we thought and that employers are losing billions of pounds because employees are less productive, less effective, or off sick.

The review demonstrates that investing in the support of mental health at work is good for business and productivity. The most important recommendation is that all employers, regardless of size or industry, should adopt six “mental health core standards” that lay basic foundations for an approach to workplace mental health.

These are:

  1. Produce, implement and communicate a mental health at work plan.
  2. Develop mental health awareness among employees.
  3. Encourage open conversations about mental health and the support available when employees are struggling.
  4. Provide employees with good working conditions and ensure they have a healthy work-life balance and opportunities for development.
  5. Promote effective people management through line managers and supervisors.
  6. Routinely monitor employee mental health and wellbeing.

At Cordell Health, we regularly inform our clients that change starts at the top. It is the empowered, effective and supportive leadership that can drive the motivation for an organisation to implement these ‘six mental health core standards’.

Our view was backed up in the final session of the day in which a panel chaired by Dr Robin Cordell debated the advantages and disadvantages of providing financial incentives for employers to support health at work and to provide incentives for employees to engage in initiatives to support their own health. The panel found that it is the senior leadership of the organisation that set the right culture for health and encourage the behaviours of employers and employees that promote health at work.

Exciting times ahead. We are certainly looking forward to supporting many more businesses as they become more health and wellbeing aware and step onto the road to change.

5 Ways To Build Emotional Resilience In Your Workplace

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The first few months of 2018 have already passed us by, and despite it feeling colder than December, we are slowly but surely rolling towards spring. As the first quarter of the year comes to a close, many businesses will be reviewing their targets and strategising for the year ahead.

There may have been budget cuts, staffing issues, or other unforeseen circumstances that have meant things haven’t gone to plan. How a business responds to this depends largely on its resilience. Its ability to turn a problem into an opportunity, and success in this, largely depends on how emotionally resilient the workforce are.

A person’s emotional resilience refers to their psychological ability to cope with or adapt to, pressure, change and stress. With stress levels on the rise, it’s a word we are hearing more and more commonly in a business environment.

Statistics show that the older generation is among the most resilient we’ve had. They fought in wars, survived tough conditions and lost their livelihoods and people they loved. The younger generation (and us in-between) have never had it so good, and conversely, have lower resilience than ever before. We are more likely to suffer from stress, ill health and are generally more unhappy and unfulfilled than ever before.

Of course, not ALL stress is bad! A healthy amount of it can make us top of our game, challenge us, reward us and give us the edge in a difficult situation. But too much of it, tied in with our lack of resilience, can affect our businesses bottom line with high staff turnover and increased sick leave.  The question is what, as a business, can we do about it?

It turns out, quite a lot!  The Emotional Resilience Toolkit, developed by Business in the Community and funded by the Department Of Health, shows us that a healthy workforce = healthy profits.  Through a 12-step process, a business is able to easily integrate emotional resilience into its health and wellbeing program.  

There is a strong case for businesses to invest in building the emotional resilience of their staff. Not just for the immediate health benefits, but for the vastly improved engagement with their work. The upside is lower absence-related costs and fewer insurance claims, improved morale, performance quality and productivity as well as a boost to their corporate reputation. Research by Gallup (Employee Engagement: The Employee Side of the HumanSigma Equation), revealed that businesses who encouraged staff to engage with their work exhibited ‘lower turnover, higher sales growth, better productivity, better customer loyalty and other manifestations of superior performance.’

Building emotional resilience doesn’t have to be a big budget option, even a simple intervention, incurring little or no additional costs can have a profound effect. Here, with ideas from the Business in the Community Toolkit, we have come up with the top 5 ways employers and employees can work together to build resilience in the workplace:

1. Foster a sense of community

People thrive on friendships and good social interaction. People who have positive relationships in the workplace are more likely to enjoy coming to work and be productive when they get there.

2. Get moving

Physical health is fundamental to our mental health, and creating a pleasant working environment and promoting healthy behaviour can bring many benefits.

3. Build a psychologically healthy environment.

Make the workplace a pleasant and happy environment through recognition, reward, job security and a management style and culture that promotes mutual trust and respect.

4. Promote learning and development

Developing new skills enhances a person’s capabilities and is empowering and helps their sense of wellbeing too.

5. Seek help

Sometimes people require specialist support with physical or mental health issues and may need to be referred on for more support. It could also be that your business needs support tackling some of the issues it faces. For example from:

  • Occupational Health.
  • Employee Assistance Programs.
  • Human resources.
  • Counselling.
  • Physiotherapy.
  • Ask employees to come forward and seek support if they feel they need it.

For support or advice for your business, you can contact Cordell Health.

A copy of the Emotional Resilience Toolkit is available from mentalhealth.org.uk and further information can be found at robertsoncooper.com.

What steps are you going to be taking to build emotional resilience in your workplace today?

6 Ways Occupational Health Can Help Your Business Boom

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The value of occupational health in a business is often judged by a return on investment.  Is the cost per head going to deliver the profit we need? It’s the way most businesses need to think in order to survive. Yet, a true picture of success does not always lie purely in the financial benefit, but also in the far broader and deeper reaching value (culturally, socially, emotionally) that a good occupational health program can provide.

There’s no denying that employee health and wellbeing contribute to successful business performance.  When supported by occupational health to encompass the work environment, culture and interpersonal relationships, the resulting productivity really can make a business boom.

There is no ‘one size fits all’. Every company has its own culture and challenges and it takes analysis and comprehensive risk assessment to design a bespoke service for maximum effect. Here we have identified the 6 most common issues faced by many businesses and identified how the implementation of occupational health service might help.

1. Reduce Sickness Absence

This is one of the most common issues and with sickness absence estimated to cost UK businesses £28.8 billion each year (PWC Research. The Rising Cost of Absence 2013. CBI. London. 2013.) it’s no wonder!  Work-related ill health and health problems related to unhealthy lifestyle respond well to a specific needs and risks assessment that improves employees’ general health and performance at work. The benefit is both direct and indirect with significantly reduced sick leave and improved performance/ productivity at work.

It might mean implementing staff health assessments, optional immunisation programs or targeting a specific training issue (such as lifting techniques). Also, welfare counselling or an overall health and well-being drive to improve employee sleep health, diet and exercise regimes.

2. Reduce Presenteeism

Presenteeism is when employees are at work but with reduced levels of productivity. It might be that they have come into work when they are unwell/ overtired/ suffering from a mental health issue or as a symptom of the workplace culture. Whilst it is unlikely to be completely avoidable, by evaluating the top preventable causes of productivity loss, cultural or individual changes can be implemented that improve productivity as well as overall wellbeing.

3. Health and Safety

Occupational health can significantly contribute to the overall health and safety systems in an organization. to ensuring compliance with regulations/ policy for health and safety.  Research by the Health and Safety Executive has shown that a sense of ‘physical security’ including safe working practices, adequacy of equipment and pleasantness of work environment is important for employees. Health and safety interventions are often focused on the prevention of injury and may not consider the health benefits or impact of any intervention.   Working with occupational health can help ensure that interventions leverage health benefits as well as meet safety requirements. Ultimately investment in prevention is always a better for a business’ reputation, as well as for financial and cultural benefit.

4. Reduce Employment Costs

Employment costs are high and improved wellbeing and good occupational health support can help develop a supportive work culture, which retains existing employees and attracts talented employees to the business.

Research (Aviva. The Sixth Health of the Workplace Report) shows that when looking for work employees were more likely to choose an employer who took health and wellbeing seriously (66%) and felt they would have a duty to work harder because of it (43%). In addition, occupational health can reduce employment costs through support with early return to work programs for employees who are sick absent and appropriate adjustments for those who have a disability.

5. Encourage Diversity

A diverse workforce is stronger and more creative, the more elements of society it represents, the more views and resources it has to draw on and the better the business’ competitive edge. Not only that, but disabled people provide a loyal and committed workforce.  Occupational health can add value by offering support through disability awareness training, educating employers, on the benefits of diversity and the positive impact it can deliver and how workplace adjustments can support those with a disability in work.

6.  Management Training

Line managers are the gatekeepers to employees’ happiness or stress and by supporting, educating and training them in how to manage sickness absence appropriately, business will often see productivity boom.

Training might include Mental Health First Aid, understanding the role of occupational health in supporting employees with long-term health problems and understanding how much the workplace can have a negative or positive impact on the long-term health and wellbeing of employees.  Improving communication, adjusting roles and appraising employees to encourage performance may have a massive effect on positive mental health, employee wellbeing, job satisfaction.  Ultimately this can have a knock-on effect on improved performance and a reduction in sickness and presenteeism rates.

To find out more about occupational health and wellbeing in the workplace contact Cordell Health or have a look at the wellbeing section of the Business in the Community website.